Creative Captures Week 5: Perspective

Last week was the final week in my photography class. The assignment was related to perspective and how shooting from different angles and at different heights can add visual interest to an image. For this assignment, I went to the Fort Worth Zoo and took a series of photos of architectural details. I shot most of these with my camera angled directly upward, and it turned out to be a fun exercise because I captured a lot of details that I would have otherwise missed.

Here’s my final submission:

Here are a few other photos from the series:

Photo Class: In Neon Color

I started a new photography class this week, and our first assignment is to create a composition using the rule of thirds. Since I’ve been loving all of the blog posts about neon colors lately (here, here, and here), I decided to practice this principle using a few images I had on hand that feature (or were easily converted into) neon colors. My final assignment is due on Sunday, and I’m hoping to head over to the arboretum this weekend to complete ‘my homework.’

In the meantime, here are a few shots where I practiced using ‘the grid’ to align the subject along the intersection of the lines, rather than in the center of the frame. Definitely an easy way to add visual interest to your photos. And a touch of neon never hurts either.

Photo Filters for the Desk-Bound

I’ve long been jealous of my husband’s iPhone. Not the phone. Not the slick design. Not the hundreds of apps. Ok, maybe a few of the hundreds of apps. I just love the effects he gets with photos by using lo-mob, picoli and other iPhone-only photo filters.

I’ve been searching for something similar online, on a website. I’m not on-the-go. I’m mostly stay-at-home: working, raising children and managing our family photos on a home computer. Archaic, I know. So, I’d like something that will quickly give my photos a retro aged, deeply saturated and futuristic look all at the same time. Ok, maybe not all at the same time.

I found one today that comes close to offering the hipster filtering effects of lo-mob and others: Rollip.com. And unlike the iPhone apps, Rollip lets you download a filtered image at the full resolution of the original image; unfortunately, that comes at a cost of $2.99 per 15 images. But the low-res versions are free.

If you know of a similar site, I’d love to hear about it.

Jason’s Photo Gallery

I guess the outcome of constantly photographing your children is having children who constantly want to photograph you. Yesterday I gave Jason control of the camera (for a change) and let him shoot to his heart’s content. The camera lens was pointed at me when most of the following were taken, but as hard as I tried to smile and say ‘cheese,’ I couldn’t seem to land myself in the frame.